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Avalara Help Center

Understand Active and Inactive Certificates

When you upload a new certificate in CertCapture, the new document doesn't automatically replace the existing one. CertCapture uses a set of rules to determine which is the active exemption document.

Understand active, inactive, and partially active certificates

Every CertCapture exemption certificate should be attached to at least one customer record. Once attached, a certificate is considered either active, inactive, or partially active. These markings help you understand the status of each certificate in your account. 

The active certificate for a customer record is the best certificate on file to support the customer's exempt status. A new certificate doesn't always become active when added to a customer record because sometimes an existing document better supports the customer's exempt status, so it remains active. When this happens, the newer certificate stays attached to the customer record but is marked inactive.

If a certificate is attached to more than one customer record and is active for one and inactive for the other, the certificate is marked partially active. 

CertCapture uses a set of rules to determine which certificate is active for a customer record. These rules are listed below in order of priority for CertCapture. Click a rule below to expand its details.

1. Is the new certificate valid?

In the examples below, A is the existing certificate and B is the newly uploaded certificate.

  • If A is invalid and B is valid, B is the active certificate and A becomes inactive
  • If A is valid and B is invalid, A is the active certificate and B becomes inactive
  • If both A and B are invalid, proceed to the next step
  • If both A and B are valid, proceed to the next step

2. Is the new certificate expired?

 In the examples below, A is the existing certificate and B is the newly uploaded certificate.

  • If A is expired and B isn't expired, B is the active certificate and A becomes inactive
  •  If A isn't expired and B is expired, A is the active certificate and B becomes inactive
  •  If both A and B are expired, proceed to the next step
  •  If both A and B are not expired, proceed to the next step

3. What is the sign date on the certificate?

In the examples below, A is the existing certificate and B is the newly uploaded certificate. 

  • If A’s sign date was more recent than B’s sign date, A is the active certificate and B becomes inactive
  •  If B’s sign date was more recent than A’s sign date, B is the active certificate and A becomes inactive
  •  If A and B have the same sign date, proceed to the next step

4. What is the expiration date on the certificate?

In the examples below, A is the existing certificate and B is the newly uploaded certificate. 

  • If A’s expiration date is later than B’s sign date, A is the active certificate and B becomes inactive
  •  If B’s expiration date is later than A’s sign date, B is the active certificate and A becomes inactive
  •  If A and B have the same expiration date, proceed to the next step

5. What date was the certificate created?

In the examples below, A is the existing certificate and B is the newly uploaded certificate. 

  • If A’s created date was more recent than B’s sign date, A is the active certificate and B becomes inactive
  •  If B’s created date was more recent than A’s sign date, B is the active certificate and A becomes inactive
  •  If A and B have the same created date, proceed to the next step

6. What is the certificate ID?

In the example below, A is the existing certificate and B is the newly uploaded certificate.

  • Every certificate added to CertCapture is assigned a certificate ID. The certificate with the highest certificate ID number becomes the active certificate, the other becomes the inactive certificate.